MONUMENTALITY

A virtual exhibition about size

February 24 - April 30, 2022

Royal Copenhagen

Blue Snake Skin, c. 1910

Porcelain

9.80h x 3.30w in

COR279

Royal Copenhagen

Xandu, c. 1930

Glazed Stoneware and Painted Copper

5h x 3.50w in

COR015

Nick Weddell

Pazquarp, 2021

Glazed porcelain

3.50h x 7w x 6.50d in

NIW0113

Royal Copenhagen

Baby Dragon, c. 1890

Porcelain

3h x 4w in

COR022

Nick Weddell

Necturn Planter, 2021

Glazed Stoneware

8h x 9w x 9d in

NIW0114

Nick Weddell

Where There's Hair There's Pleasure, 2021

Glazed porcelain

3.50h x 4w x 4d in

NIW0105

Nick Weddell

The Bangler, 2021

Glazed porcelain

4.50h x 5w x 4.50d in

NIW0106

Emile Lenoble

Chevrons Vase, c. 1920

Stoneware

4.30h x 5.50w in

LEE012

Michael Anderson

Climbing Snakes, 1900-1905

Porcelain

5h x 3w in

ANM003

Ernest Chaplet

Bloody Beautiful, c. 1890

Glazed porcelain

5.80h x 4w in

C0039

Edmond Lachenal

Conjoined Gourd, c. 1900

Glazed stoneware

3h x 6.50w in

C0168

Clément Massier

Faux Gold, c1900

Earthenware

3h x 5.50w in

C0221

Lucien Lévy-Dhurmer

Grotto, c1888

Stoneware

4h x 2.80w in

C0230

Manufacture Nationale de Sevres

Garnet Frost (to be updated), 1900

Glazed porcelain

C0387

Jean-Michel Cazin

Unknown, 1900

Glazed Stoneware

CAM006

Jean-Michel Cazin

Marble Floral Vase, 1895

Porcelain

5h x 2.50w in

CAM003

Galileo Chini

Salmon Stream, c.1898

Glazed earthenware

6.50h x 5.50w in

CHG021

Jean-Michel Cazin

Ovoid Bisque Vase, 1906

Bisque Porcelain

5.25h x 4.50w in

CAM005

Manufacture Nationale de Sevres

Great Bird (to be updated), 1909

Glazed porcelain

C0385

Auguste Delaherche

Lucky Clover, c. 1920

Porcelain

2.30h x 3.30w in

DEA072

Taxile Doat

Vase Couvert, c. 1926

Porcelain

4h x 2w in

DOT032

Morten Løbner Espersen

Glazed Pearl 10, 2019

Glazed Stoneware

6.69h x 7.09w x 7.09d in

ELM126

Morten Løbner Espersen

Glazed Pearl 1, 2019

Glazed Stoneware

6.69h x 7.09w x 7.09d in

ELM117

Unknown Anonymous

Russian Pour Pot, c.1900

Glazed stoneware

2.75h x 4.25w x 3.50d in

JJG040

Gareth Mason

On Entry, 2010

Stoneware, Vitreous Slip, Glaze, Iron

5h x 4.50w x 4.50d in

MAG049

Herman Kähler

Petite Turquoise set

Stoneware

5.30h x 2.30w in

KAH004

Gareth Mason

Small Object #6

Woodfired stoneware and porcelain, gold lustre lugs

3.15h x 4.70w x 3.90d in

MAG214

Gareth Mason

Small Object #4

Porcelain, stoneware, gold lustre lugs

3.75h x 3.50w x 3d in

MAG212

Gareth Mason

Sprout

Stoneware, porcelain, glaze, oxides, lustre

6.89h x 4.33w x 4.53d in

MAG208

Gareth Mason

Buckle, 2017

Porcelain, fluid celadon glaze

6.10h x 4.92w x 4.53d in

MAG265

Nick Weddell

Tooth Fairy, 2021

Glazed porcelain

4.50h x 4w x 4d in

NIW0111

Aneta Regel

Container, 2019

Stoneware, Porcelain, Volcanic rock components, Glaze, Slips, Resin

5.51h x 5.91w x 5.91d in

REA190

Aneta Regel

Container Green, 2019

Stoneware, Porcelain, Volcanic rock components, Glaze, Slips, Resin

7.09h x 5.12w x 5.91d in

REA191

Fritz Vehring

Mechanical Vase, 1981

Glazed Stoneware

7.25h x 6w in

VEF001

Manufacture Nationale de Sevres

White Thistle, c. 1900

Porcelain

4h x 2.50w in

SE037

Ursula Scheid

Low Vessel with Stripe, 1986

Stoneware

3.35h x 7.48w x 7.48d in

SCU009

Ursula Scheid

Doublewall Vessel, 1974

Porcelain

4.53h x 5.71w x 5.71d in

SCU008

Gareth Mason

Bauble, 2016-2018

Porcelain, stoneware, glazes, oxides, fluxes, scrap metal, copper, slip

7.48h x 5.91w x 5.91d in

MAG257

Gerald Weigel (1990s)

Untitled, 1997

Glazed stoneware

6h x 6w x 6d in

WEGO009

Ingeborg + Bruno Asshoff

Thin-Necked Vessel

Glazed Stoneware

IBA011

Ernest Chaplet

Small Crackle Vase

Glazed porcelain

CHE004

Ernest Chaplet

Small Lidded Pot

CHE003

Press Release

This online exhibition will run from February 24 - March 31, 2022

Please email maty@jasonjacques.com with inquiries regarding pricing and availability.

Please email grace@jasonjacques.com with inquiries regarding press and image useage.

PRESS KIT

Jason Jacques Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of Monumentality, a virtual exhibition centered around size. Small objects have long been a source of fascination within the world of art and design; there’s a pleasant tension surrounding something which is small enough to be held in one’s hand yet too exquisite to touch, something which seems bigger than itself.

After all, a monumental form need only be a few inches high, according to twentieth century sculptor’s Henry Moore’s musings from a 1964 interview for Warren Forma’s Five British Sculptors: Work and Talk. He went on to elaborate: “There is a difference between scale and size. A small sculpture only three of four inches big can have about it a monumental scale… a small thing only a few inches big might seem, if it has a monumental scale, to be any size.”

This exhibition is an analysis of this very idea— the premise that, by unraveling the relationship between scale and size in this abstract sense, we may begin a greater discussion concerning what gives a work of art or design aura and presence. Small objects carry myriad connotations. They may be seen as trinkets or tchotchkes. At once, they invoke a sense of preciousness that often transforms them into treasures, antique curios with a jewel-like rarity. The difference, per Moore’s earlier statement, has partially to do with in the sense of scale an artist imbues an object with, a fact potters have toyed with for centuries.

Monumentality is a clay-based inquiry in pursuit of the bewitching moment the eye cannot be torn away from the undersized, dazzling object on a mantle, on a bookshelf, atop a writing desk, or on the vanity. An inquiry in pursuit of what draws the eye towards the small and arresting flea-market curio.

This exhibition contains a discerning selection of contemporary and historic ceramic vessels that span a broad array of styles and dates, from the late nineteenth century onwards. The smallest piece, a petite cachepot made c. 1920 by Auguste Delaherche, stands at a mere 2.3 inches.  Its milky white surface is delicately painted with green clovers. The tallest, a long-necked, porcelain vessel, made by Royal Copenhagen c. 1910, comes in at 9.8 inches. The ultramarine hue of its impossibly fine crackle glaze gives it a gem-like quality. In between is a grouping of works whose size sits in complex dialogue with their other formal attributes— the artist’s use of texture, choice of color, handling of figuration, or application of a functional purpose.

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